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Hallie's Comet A Comparing and Categorizing Game
Ages: 5-10   Grades: K-5

This game is packed with 600 stimuli to develop expression, vocabulary, and thinking skills.     

Outcomes

  • Effectively express differences and similarities
  • Name items by category
  • Develop a rich, expressive vocabulary
Game
#37422
$35.00
Add to Cart

There are 200 illustrated game cards.  Each game card has two illustrated objects on the front and three questions on the back.  The first question focuses attention on how the illustrated items are different.  The second question focuses on the similarities of two items.  The third question targets categorization skills.  The illustrations give students with strong visual skills and weak auditory skills a boost—they don't have to rely on memory to recall details about each item. 

The cards are organized by:

  • animals
  • foods
  • school/curricular
  • household
  • clothing and accessories
  • potpourri (occupations, transportation, places, sports, and leisure)

Students learn to attend to critical features and gain flexibility in thinking and verbal expression.  Categorizing requires students to determine how items can belong to the same group despite having unique characteristics. 

The heavy-duty, single-fold game board is compact and sets up in seconds.  

 

How To Play This Game

Game Play

  • Take a card, show the pictures, and read either the first question (differences), second question (similarities), or third question (categories) to the player.  Feel free to change the wording of the question, depending on the player's level of understanding (e.g., same vs. alike, different vs. not the same).  Answers on the cards are provided as examples only.  Accept all reasonable responses.
  • Encourage players to use the pictures for extra cues when describing how the items are different and/or the same.  When players are giving similarities and differences, remind them to focus on the typical item (e.g., long-sleeved turtleneck) rather than the not-so-typical item (e.g., short-sleeved or sleeveless turtleneck).
  • If the player answers the question correctly, he rolls the die and moves that number of spaces.  If he answers incorrectly, he doesn't roll the die or move his pawn.  Play passes to the player on the left.
  • If a player lands on a spot that begins a shortcut, he moves his pawn to the end of the shortcut.  If a player lands on the "Chat with the Moon" or "Take a Meteor Shower" spot, he loses his next turn.

Game Variations

  • Set a time limit for game play (e.g., 20 minutes).  The player closest to Finish at the end of that time wins the game.
  • If a player answers incorrectly, allow another player to give an answer.  If the second player's response is correct, that player rolls the die and moves her pawn.  Play then continues to the original player's left.
  • For more advanced players, ask all of the questions on a card.  The player compares and contrasts the pictured items and answers a categorizing question.  For each question the player answers correctly, he rolls the die and moves his pawn.
  • Use the game cards alone for a quick drill activity.

Copyright © 2003

Components
11" x 17" heavy-duty, single-fold game board; 200 double-sided picture/stimuli cards on perforated card stock; answer key; 6 pawns; die; instructions; vinyl folder

Warning: CHOKING HAZARD - Small parts, not for children under 3 yrs.
  • An efficient lexicon is not organized like a dictionary. Instead, words and their properties (e.g., semantic meaning) are interconnected and associative.  Language-impaired children have fewer lexical entries than their typically-developing peers and fewer connections among the words they know (Backenbury & Pye, 2007).
  • Categorization economizes storage of the information in the mental lexicon.  This facilitates efficient retrieval for future use and enhances the capacity to extend knowledge (Miller & Eilam, 2008).
  • Klein and Freitag (1991) found that instructional games, without sacrificing performance, enhance the motivation of students in the areas of attention, relevance, confidence, and satisfaction.

Hallie's Comet A Comparing and Categorizing Game incorporates these principles and is also based on expert professional practice.

References

Backenbury, T., & Pye, C. (2007). Semantic deficits in children with language impairments: Issues for clinical assessment. Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools, 36, 5-16.

Klein, J.D., & Freitag, E. (1991). Effects of using an instructional game on motivation and performance. Journal of Educational Research, 84(5), 303-308.

Miller, P., & Eilam, B. (2008). Development in the thematic and containment-relation-oriented organization of word concepts. Journal of Educational Research, 101(6), 350-362.

Author(s)

Lauri Whiskeyman, Barb Truman

Biography

Lauri Whiskeyman, M.A., Ed.S., CCC-SLP, and Barb Truman, M.A., CCC-SLP, are speech-language pathologists who worked with children in preschool through high school before joining the product development team at LinguiSystems.  While at LinguiSystems, Lauri and Barb wrote and edited products, fielded questions from customers, and staffed booths at conventions.  Lauri is currently a speech-language pathologist working with students in preschool through middle school.  Barb is currently enjoying her role as a stay-at-home mom, allowing her to spend precious time with her husband, adopted son, and other family members.

Lauri and Barb are also co-authors of No-Glamour Articulation; No-Glamour Articulation Cards; 10 Quick-Play Folder Games Associations; 10 Quick-Play Folder Games Associations (Spanish/English); 10 Quick-Play Folder Games Concepts; 50 Quick-Play Articulation Games; Scissors, Glue, and Vocabulary, Too!; and Spotlight on Articulation.  Lauri is also the author of LanguageBurst, and Barb is also the author of Barnaby's Burrow and co-author of The Auditory Processing Game.

Introduction

Game Play

  • Take a card, show the pictures, and read either the first question (differences), second question (similarities), or third question (categories) to the player.  Feel free to change the wording of the question, depending on the player's level of understanding (e.g., same vs. alike, different vs. not the same).  Answers on the cards are provided as examples only.  Accept all reasonable responses.
  • Encourage players to use the pictures for extra cues when describing how the items are different and/or the same.  When players are giving similarities and differences, remind them to focus on the typical item (e.g., long-sleeved turtleneck) rather than the not-so-typical item (e.g., short-sleeved or sleeveless turtleneck).
  • If the player answers the question correctly, he rolls the die and moves that number of spaces.  If he answers incorrectly, he doesn't roll the die or move his pawn.  Play passes to the player on the left.
  • If a player lands on a spot that begins a shortcut, he moves his pawn to the end of the shortcut.  If a player lands on the "Chat with the Moon" or "Take a Meteor Shower" spot, he loses his next turn.