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Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup
Words With Equal Emphasis
Ages: 3-6   Grades: PreK-1

Children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech learn to say two-syllable words with engaging illustrations and multisensory teaching.  Improve word stress, intonation, and motor planning.   

Outcomes

  • Master the motor plan and sequences for two-syllable words
  • Develop prosody and intonation skills
Book
#31193
$14.95
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Children with childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) typically have problems with prosody and longer, more complex utterances.  

Words With Equal Emphasis teaches a child the appropriate stress and intonation by removing the semantic load of a word until he's mastered the normal flow and rhythm of the word.  Words are divided into syllables.  The syllables are imitated repeatedly, in a backward order, until he can say the word easily.

Each page in the book starts with the final syllable of a word and systematically works forward, ending with the target word.

Use the vibrant illustrations as visual and tactile cues for smooth movements at the syllable and word levels.  The practice method is inherently fun and motivating!

The book includes 12 reproducible picture cards to use for more practice.

The Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Words With Equal Emphasis may be purchased individually or as an 8-Book Set.

The 8-Book set consists of:

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Words With Equal Emphasis  
(2-syllable words such as baseball and birthday)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Creepy, Crawly Things  
(2-syllable words such as fuzzy and hopping)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Things to Ride  
(2-syllable words such as subway and firetruck)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Yummy Things to Eat  
(2-syllable words such as muffin and apple)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup More Yummy Things to Eat  
(3-syllable words such as banana and lemonade)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Animals  
(3-syllable words such as ladybug and octopus)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Places  
(3-syllable words such as hospital and factory)

Early Apraxia of Speech Stories Backward Buildup Things People Do  
(3-syllable words such as musician and weatherman)

 

Copyright © 2011

Components
16 8½" x 11" coated pages

Author(s)

Linda Bowers

Biography

Linda Bowers has been a speech-language pathologist since 1973 and co-owner, co-founder, and researcher for LinguiSystems since 1977.  She loves to cook, travel, and be with friends and family.  She is the proud mother and grandmother of a wonderful daughter and two wickedly funny grandsons.

Introduction

According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA, 2007), childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is "a neurological childhood (pediatric) speech sound disorder in which the precision and consistency of movements underlying speech are impaired in the absence of neuromuscular deficits (e.g., abnormal reflexes, abnormal tone).  CAS may occur as a result of known neurological impairment, in association with complex neurobehavioral disorders of known or unknown origin, or as an idiopathic neurogenic speech sound disorder.  The core impairment in planning and/or programming spatiotemporal parameter of movement sequences results in errors in speech sound production and prosody."

Finding its roots in teaching English as a Second Language, backward buildup (BB) is a strategy that helps children learn to pronounce unfamiliar words.  It teaches children with CAS appropriate stress and intonation by removing the semantic load of a word until they've mastered the normal flow and rhythm of the word.

This technique divides words into syllables and has the client imitate the syllables, repeatedly, in a backward order.  It's important that you model correct stress and intonation of each word, lowering or raising the pitch in the right places.  For instance, in the word paper, the first syllable is stressed and the second syllable requires a slight downward vocal pitch.  So when doing BB, you should model, per and pa, putting stress on and a slight rise in intonation on pa.  The client can then imitate your model.

This book features two-syllable spondee words, which are words that have equal emphasis on each syllable.  Each page provides you with the order in which to say the syllables before you put them together to say the target word.  Each syllable duo is repeated  three times before you say the word in its correct order.  The word is said once by itself and then inserted into a context that is pictured.  The following page (the "reveal" page) repeats the syllables and the word in another context that is pictured.

The delightful illustrations and the technique itself will add some lighthearted fun and interest to drill work.  I hope you use these books over and over again since apraxia therapy requires intense and frequent practice in order to achieve the goal of consistent and intelligible speech.

Linda

Reference

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). (2007). Childhood apraxia of speech [Technical Report]. Retrieved from www.asha.org/docs/html/TR2007-00278.html#sec1.1.2